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Asked by Kevin on January 4, 2015

Hi Everyone, I have a few questions regarding job interviews and was wondering if you could answer the questions below. Before an interview has taken place can I simply walk up to the job recruiter and say, “I am interested in the position what is the next step I need to do?” What questions should an interviewer not ask the interviewee? What questions should an interviewee ask the interviewer? What questions should an interviewee NOT ask the interviewer? After the interview, is it the appropriate to inquire about the salary of the position? After the interview, is it appropriate to ask the interviewer when I can hear from them? Thanks for your help!

Answered by Heather, Hiring Expert at The Hershey Company, on January 8, 2015

Lots of questions, I will take them one at a time.

Q: Before an interview has taken place can I simply walk up to the job recruiter and say, “I am interested in the position what is the next step I need to do?”
A: The appropriate time to state that is at the end of the interview. Recruiters like it when we can gauge a candidate’s interest level, but doing it in the beginning is not the time.
Q: What questions should an interviewer not ask the interviewee?
A: Anything that wouldn’t be appropriate in the workplace.
Q: What questions should an interviewee ask the interviewer?
A: Anything related to the job you applied for that you need clarification on to help you make a decision on if this company & role is right for you.
Q: What questions should an interviewer ask the interviewee?
A: This answer could go on forever, but here is a generalization - Questions directly related to the skills need to do the job, motivational fit, past job history, behavioral based, relocation, salary, bonus, etc.
Q: What questions should an interviewee NOT ask the interviewer?
A: Do not ask anything personal, unless it relate to the Company or their role. For instance it is ok to ask “why did you choose to take a job at this company?”. It is personal, but about the company.
Q: After the interview, is it the appropriate to inquire about the salary of the position?
A: Yes
Q: After the interview, is it appropriate to ask the interviewer when I can hear from them?
A: Yes

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Answered by Kacie, Hiring Expert at Mutual of Omaha, on January 12, 2015

Q: Before an interview has taken place can I simply walk up to the job recruiter and say, “I am interested in the position what is the next step I need to do?
A: If you know the job recruiter, it would be appropriate to express interest before an interview has taken place and to see what the next step is.  Most of the time, however, a job seeker would not have access to the Recruiter so your chance to express interest in the position would be during the interview process.
Q: What questions should an interviewer not ask the interviewee?
Some examples of things an interviewer should not ask questions about include: age, national origin, marital status, number of dependents, child care arrangements, credit score, race, religion, housing situation, health or disability status.
Q: What questions should an interviewee ask the interviewer?
A: I will give some examples of the types of questions that would be appropriate to ask, but the key here is to ask questions!  Even if you feel everything has been covered, still come prepared with a few questions to ask at the end of the interview.  Some good questions include: What have you enjoyed most while working here?  What is the company/department culture? What is the department's management style?  Does the company support continuing education/training? 
Q: What questions should an interviewee NOT ask the interviewer?
A: Do not ask any questions that are not job related/company related.
Q: After the interview, is it appropriate to ask the interviewer when I can hear from them?
A: Absolutely.

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Answered by Stephanie, Hiring Expert at AT&T Inc., on January 13, 2015

Questions that an interviewer should never ask: Questions that are not related to your skills and qualifications for the position.  Some Examples: What is your race, What is your national origin, What is your maiden name, How old are you, Do you have any disabilities, What is your religion, Are you pregnant, Have you ever been arrested, What type of military discharge did you receive, Have you ever filed bankruptcy, Do you belong to any organizations?
Questions that should be asked by an interviewee: What skills and experiences would make an ideal candidate?, What is the single largest problem facing your staff and would I be in a position to help you solve this problem?, What have you enjoyed most about working here?, What constitutes success at this position and this firm or nonprofit?, Do you have any hesitations about my qualifications?, Are there continuing education opportunities?, Can you tell me about the team I would be working with?, What is the next step in the process?
Questions that should NOT be asked by an interviewee: What is a typical salary for this position?, Nothing that can easily be found on-line regarding the company, How much vacation do your employees get?, Can I work another job part-time?, Do you allow telecommuting?, How many hours am I expected to work?, What do you think are my chances of getting this job?, Where do people eat lunch and how long is their lunch break?, Can I bring my dog to work?
Closing conversation regarding follow up when a candidate should hear something is totally acceptable.

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Answered by Siobhan, Hiring Expert at Accenture, on January 19, 2015

Yes – you can feel free to ask your recruiter the questions on your mind. It is certainly appropriate to restate your interest in the position and ask what, if anything else you need to do to be considered for the position. In terms of what questions are appropriate – your best bet is to stick to questions about the company and the position in which you are applying for, and using the answers as an opportunity to showcase how you will be able to use your skills to add value to that position. Best of luck! - Betsy, Accenture campus recruiter

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